Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2016, Page: 11-16
Techno-Economic Comparative Assessment of Asvt Versus Conventional Sub-stations for Rural Electrification
Kitheka Joel Mwithui, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya
David Murage, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi, Kenya
Michael Juma Saulo, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Technical University of Mombasa, Mombasa, Kenya
Received: Apr. 7, 2016;       Accepted: Apr. 16, 2016;       Published: May 3, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.epes.20160502.11      View  4062      Downloads  138
Abstract
The overall electricity access rate is still very low in most sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. The rate is even lower in rural areas where most of the population in these countries lives. In Kenya about 8% of rural communities lives at close proximity to High voltage transmission lines yet they have no electricity. One of the main obstacles to rural electrification (RE) is the high cost of laying the distribution infrastructure owing to the dispersed nature of loads and low demand. Thus, electrifying the rural areas needs to be considered holistically and not just on the financial viability. To reduce cost, it is important that auxiliary service voltage transformer (ASVT) sub-station, which are cheaper than the conventional sub-station be explored. This research aimed at carrying out the techno-economic assessment of Auxiliary service voltage transformer sub-station and the conventional sub-station that can be used to step down 132kv supply from transmission line to 240v to supply single phase loads in rural areas where there is no any nearby conventional sub-station but there are trunks of high voltage transmission lines at close proximity. The research further explored the maximum number of ASVT sub-stations that can be terminated on 132kv within a specified distance beyond which it would be economically viable to use a conventional sub-station. In this research local prices and the life cycle costing of sub-stations were used.
Keywords
Auxiliary Service Voltage Transformer (ASVT), Techno-Economic Assessment (TEA), Transmission Line (TL), Life Cycle Costing (LCC), Conventional Sub-station (CS)
To cite this article
Kitheka Joel Mwithui, David Murage, Michael Juma Saulo, Techno-Economic Comparative Assessment of Asvt Versus Conventional Sub-stations for Rural Electrification, American Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2016, pp. 11-16. doi: 10.11648/j.epes.20160502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
World energy outlook, SBN: 978-92-6412413-4.
[2]
G. Dagbjartsson, C. Gaunt., ‘Rural electrification,’ A scoping report, 2013.
[3]
M. Saulo, M. Mbogho, “Implication of capacitor coupling substation on rural electrification planning in kenya," in Procceedings of 3rd international Kenya Society of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Conference, KSEEE, 2014.
[4]
M. J. Saulo, Penetration level of unconventional rural electrification technologies on power networks. PhD thesis, University of Capetown, May 2014.
[5]
M. Saulo, C. Gaunt, M. Mbogho, ‘Comparative assessment of capacitor coupled substation and auxiliary service voltage transformer for rural electrification’ in 2nd Annual International Conference in Kabaraka University, 2012.
[6]
R. Gomez, A. Solano, C. Gaunt, ‘Rural electrification project development, using auxiliary service voltage transformer," pp. 1-6, 2010.
[7]
Arteche Instrument Transformer Manual (2010): ASVT245 and ASVT-145 manual and technical brochures.
[8]
Kitheka J. Saulo J. Murage D. ‘Determination of the penetration level of ASVT sub-station on 132kv line without voltage profile violation.’ International Journal of energy and power engineering vol 5-1, pp 22-28, Feb 2016.
[9]
Omboua A. Application report “the high voltage line becomes a power distributor: A successful test in Congo – Brazzaville” Congo. 2006.
[10]
Omar C., Gomez R. Solano A. Acosta E. (2010) Eradicating energy poverty “Rural Electrification in Chuahua, Mexico at one third of the cost versus a conventional substation” Mexico.
[11]
Saulo M. J, Gaunt C. T “implication of using Auxiliary Service Voltage Transformer substation for Rural Electrification.” International journal of energy and power engineering. Vol 4-1) pp 1-11. 2014.
[12]
Kitheka J. Saulo J. Murage D. ‘The penetration level of Auxiliary service voltage transformer sub-station on a power network for rural electrification,’ in Kabarak University 5th Annual conference, July 2015.
[13]
Kitheka J. ‘The optimum penetration level of Auxiliary service voltage transformer sub-station on 132kv transmission line without voltage profile violation.,’ Msc thesis, JKUAT, 2016.
[14]
G. Anderson, K. Yanev, ‘Non conventional substation and distribution system for rural electrification," in 3rd IASTED Africa PES 2010, 2010.
Browse journals by subject